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Devenish Island New

Ferry to Devenish Island recommences for the summer

1 July

The Northern Ireland Environment Agency (NIEA) has announced the re-launch of the ferry service from Trory Point to Devenish monastic island on Lower Lough Erne, County Fermanagh.

From 1 July until the end of the summer, the Molaise III, an Osprey 12 passengers cruiser accessible to wheelchairs, will run a five day ferry service from Thursday to Monday inclusive.

To ensure that everyone has the opportunity to cruise on Lough Erne and experience this beautiful and mystic monastic setting, individual cost of travel will be £3, with group, senior citizen and child concessions of £2 and children under five years old sailing free of charge .

Michael Morgan from NIEA said: “For a real day out with all the family why not take the ferry, visit the sites and picnic on this very idyllic island. On the 1st July and many other days throughout the summer you will also have the opportunity to meet St Molaise and hear the stories, folklore and tales of long ago.The Molaise III ferry service to the island is very flexible and has sailings from Trory Point at 10am, 1pm, 3pm & 5pm, so you can stay for as long or as short as you want returning in comfort and style at a time that suits you. “

Commenting on the re-launch Councillor Thomas O’Reilly, Chairman of Fermanagh District Council said, “We are very pleased to hear that the ferry service from Trory Point to Devenish has been re-instated for the Summer season. Devenish Island is one of Fermanagh’s iconic landmarks and no holiday in the Fermanagh Lakelands would be complete without a visit to this mystical place.”

The ferry crossing can accommodate group booking and also sail outside the scheduled sailing timetable by prior appointment via the ferry Hotline on 07702 052 873 or by contacting the Northern Ireland Environment Agency at Castle Archdale direct on (028) 68621588.

Places To Visit

Devenish Island Monastic Site, Co.Fermanagh, Enniskillen

Famous for its perfect 12th-century round tower and ruined Augustinian abbey.

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